The Key to Video Cable Performance



 



Belden Professional Video Cables and Connectors




Virtually all TV broadcasters around the world have gone digital. Even Hollywood has converted from film to digital images. While some of these cameras record the data on hard drives or SSD (solid-state drives),  at some point you’re going to send this data, those digital images, from Point A to Point B. If you want to carry the hard drive or SSD from place to place, that’s fine (so-called “sneaker net”) but it is time-consuming and inefficient. Why not put that signal on a cable to move it from place to place? That’s what most broadcasters do. And, while you could do this on fiber, converting from electrons to photons and back again at the other end, the economical and simple way is still over copper cable, most commonly coax cable.

1694A

The photo to the right is Belden 1694A, the world’s most popular video cable. It’s a good compromise between size, distance, and cost. It is easy to put on connectors, especially the one-piece compression connectors that Belden now offers. (Our current record is two connectors in 33 seconds.) And these connectors, and the 1694A cable, can carry virtually any video signal you might wish to use including analog, 4×3 digital (SD-SDI), high definition (HD-SDI) and even 3gig (1080p/50 or 1080p/60).

The only thing you have to consider is how far the cable can go. Here’s a chart showing the recommended distance for 1694A and all of our other digital cables. Read more »

No Hands for 4K

Last week I was in Hollywood at the SMPTE yearly shindig. I gave my ultimate paper (so far) on 4K Video over Coax. With 500 people in the room, it occurred to me as I began that I had the perfect group to find out some things. So I began by asking my audience a question. “If I could make a single coax that would run 4K video as far as you want, how many people would put that in?” I waited for a couple of seconds. Nothing happened. No hands went up. None! An article in the TV Technology website by Deborah McAdams the next day said there were hands that were ‘tentatively’ going up, but I couldn’t see them.

Tentative-Hand-Raising

I pointed out to my audience that I could save Belden a lot of money right here, and not bring out any 4K single-link coax, and save us a bundle in connectors as well. I suppose I broke a cardinal rule about public speaking, “Never ask the audience a question to which you do not already know the answer.” Well, clearly there was something I didn’t know. It was left up to me to interpret my audience’s answer. What did it mean? Read more »

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