Blog # 4: Construction Products Regulation: What Does it Mean for You? – Part I

KV_Logo European CommWith new rules being implemented by the European Commission (EC), construction products – including cabling for fixed installations – can no longer be used in European buildings or civil engineering works if they are not tested and certified according to the new Construction Products Regulation (CPR) rules.

Although this may seem like something that mainly affects cable manufacturers, it’s equally as important for specifiers, designers, builders and building owners, distributors and importers, as they all have new responsibilities once CPR becomes effective.

Blog #4 in our CPR blog series focuses on the CPR obligations of specifiers, designers, builders and building owners.

Since CPR does not only apply to cable manufacturers, it is important that the parties at the receiving end of the supply chain (end-users) also fully understand their roles in ensuring CPR compliance.

According to the new CPR rules, specifiers, designers, builders and building owners should refer to the harmonized technical specifications (specifically to the requirements of individual characteristics) when working with the project team to draw up specifications.

When choosing products for construction projects, end-users should review the Declaration of Conformity/Performance (DoP) from the manufacturer. They must also check national annexes or standard recommendations, which offer guidance about appropriate minimum product performance levels. Furthermore, compliance with any additional local building regulations should also be followed by end-users.

As an industry-leading cable manufacturer, Belden sees it as our responsibility to educate and support the complete value chain on specific CPR tasks. As CPR awareness increases in the European market, and understanding of the additional responsibilities that come with CPR are still limited, we are committed to working with everyone in the value chain, from end-users and consultants to systems integrators and distributors, to provide education and information about CPR requirements.

Please visit info.belden.com/cpr for more information.

Cabling Systems Get Ready for New CPR Rules

The EC’s Construction Products Regulation (CPR) rules apply to many construction products, including wire and cabling.

With these new rules from the European Commission (EC), construction products – including cabling – can no longer be used in European buildings if they are not tested and certified based on specific criteria. Read more »

CPR: A Major Change in How EU Construction Products are Sold

KV_Logo European CommThe construction industry is facing a significant transformation regarding how construction products are sold in Europe. New rules implemented by the European Commission (EC) call for products – including cables– to be tested and certified based on certain criteria before they are used in European buildings.

The Construction Products Regulation (CPR) rules ensure that the construction industry uses similar language to describe product information from manufacturers in different countries when referring to performance, specifying requirements or selecting products.

Here are a few examples of how the new CPR rules can bring positive change to the construction industry. Read more »

Construction Products Regulation: What is it?

With new rules being implemented by the European Commission (EC), construction products – including cabling for fixed installations – can no longer be used in European buildings or civil engineering works if they are not tested and certified according to the new Construction Products Regulation (CPR) rules.

smoke_detector

 

The EC’s CPR rules ensure that distributors, consultants, systems integrators, installers and building owners now have reliable product information from different manufacturers in different countries. CPR provides one common language that manufacturers can use when talking about performance of their product. This same language will  also have to be used by architects, engineers, contractors and member states when specifying requirements and selecting products.

Replacing the Construction Products Directive (CPD), which was first published by the EC in 1989, CPR is already applicable for non-cable products since July 2013. The official CPR introduction for cables has officially come into force as of June 10, 2016 with the transition period ending on July. 1, 2017.

CPR combines the common technical language with an agreed system of Assessment and Verification of Constancy of Performance, a framework of Certified Notified Bodies and Mandatory CE Marking.

CPR provides a framework of potential assessment criteria in the following areas:

  1. Mechanical resistance and stability
  2. Safety in the case of fire
  3. Hygiene, health and the environment
  4. Safety in use
  5. Protection against noise
  6. Energy economy and heat retention

Cable product performance is covered in the 2nd requirement that focuses on fire safety ,which includes “Reaction to Fire” (How much  a cable contributes to a fire and its harmful  consequences) and “Resistance to Fire” (For how long a cable can continue to function in case of a fire). Initially CPR is only being implemented for cable performance related to “Reaction to fire.”

Cables will be evaluated based on their performance in a simulated installation, with simultaneous measurements of flame spread, heat release, flaming droplets, smoke emission and corrosivity of gases. They are then placed into the correct Euroclass system based on performance in the following areas: 

  • Flame spread
  • Smoke production
  • Burning falling particles (droplets)
  • Corrosiveness/acidity of combustion gases

For cable manufacturers CPR means that they need to have their cables tested according to the new requirements, provide a Declaration of Performance according to the new Euroclasses, affix a CE Marking to the product and periodically control production.

Although it may seem like CPR only applies to manufacturers, it’s equally as important for everyone in the construction industry to use and understand. Make sure to look out for the following Belden blogs that provide further details about CPR and will explain what CPR means for you. You can learn more about CPR at our dedicated micro-site.

The Key to Video Cable Performance



 



Belden Professional Video Cables and Connectors




Virtually all TV broadcasters around the world have gone digital. Even Hollywood has converted from film to digital images. While some of these cameras record the data on hard drives or SSD (solid-state drives),  at some point you’re going to send this data, those digital images, from Point A to Point B. If you want to carry the hard drive or SSD from place to place, that’s fine (so-called “sneaker net”) but it is time-consuming and inefficient. Why not put that signal on a cable to move it from place to place? That’s what most broadcasters do. And, while you could do this on fiber, converting from electrons to photons and back again at the other end, the economical and simple way is still over copper cable, most commonly coax cable.

1694A

The photo to the right is Belden 1694A, the world’s most popular video cable. It’s a good compromise between size, distance, and cost. It is easy to put on connectors, especially the one-piece compression connectors that Belden now offers. (Our current record is two connectors in 33 seconds.) And these connectors, and the 1694A cable, can carry virtually any video signal you might wish to use including analog, 4×3 digital (SD-SDI), high definition (HD-SDI) and even 3gig (1080p/50 or 1080p/60).

The only thing you have to consider is how far the cable can go. Here’s a chart showing the recommended distance for 1694A and all of our other digital cables. Read more »

HDBaseT to the Rescue!

Just in case full high-definition resolution isn’t enough, 4K is the next generation resolution that will deliver a whole new level of clarity at roughly four times the resolution of 1080p.   Despite limited 4K content currently available to consumers, Samsung, LG, Sony, Panasonic and others are already selling 4K TV sets and widespread adoption is eventually expected. An ABI Research report from last year expects 4K to surpass 10% of North American TV households by 2018.

HDBASET

4K covers two formats that are both supported in the HDMI 1.4 specification – 3840p X 2160p and 4096p X 2160p. While HDMI 1.4 supports 4K resolution, adds an audio channel that enables upstream audio connections, and can deliver 100 Mbps IP-based applications with an added Ethernet channel, there are some cabling and connectivity challenges to consider that include distance limitations, installation and testing.   HDBaseT resolves these issues.

What is HDBaseT? Read more »

Think Fibre Can’t Handle Extreme Temperatures? Think Again.

Fiber InstallationIn the world of broadcasting, we generally think of two different environments:

The indoor studio with sets and control rooms and the outside location where actual sporting and other events take place.

Inside the broadcasting studio, fibre is used to connect broadcasting equipment such as cameras, storage equipment, editing appliances and playout devices.

While there are always concerns in the studio about fibre being subjected to flexing, twisting and abrasion as it is coiled up on the floor, handled by multiple users or dragged across the studio from one filming area to the next, today’s heavy-duty rugged fibre optic cable is specifically designed to withstand these environments. And when it comes to temperature, the studio is considered a controlled environment that normally stays in the 20˚C to 26 ˚C room temperature range. But happens when we move outside? Read more »

In Defense of Tinned Copper

Oxidized-Copper-Statue-of-LibertyI spend a lot of time in the fancy cable section of Belden. These are cables for high-frequency applications, such as digital video coax, or 10-gigabit data cables. These cables all use bare copper conductors. On the other hand, if you look at the Belden catalog from the 50,000 foot view, you will see a whole lot of cables we make use tinned copper. If you’re an ancient engineer or installer (like me) you came from a time when tinned copper conductors were pretty much everything. Products like 8451 and 9451 and almost any analog audio cables are all tinned copper. Go back to the coax cables from long ago, and many of them are tinned copper. So what happened? And why is Lampen bringing up this issue now? Very simple. Read more »

No Hands for 4K

Last week I was in Hollywood at the SMPTE yearly shindig. I gave my ultimate paper (so far) on 4K Video over Coax. With 500 people in the room, it occurred to me as I began that I had the perfect group to find out some things. So I began by asking my audience a question. “If I could make a single coax that would run 4K video as far as you want, how many people would put that in?” I waited for a couple of seconds. Nothing happened. No hands went up. None! An article in the TV Technology website by Deborah McAdams the next day said there were hands that were ‘tentatively’ going up, but I couldn’t see them.

Tentative-Hand-Raising

I pointed out to my audience that I could save Belden a lot of money right here, and not bring out any 4K single-link coax, and save us a bundle in connectors as well. I suppose I broke a cardinal rule about public speaking, “Never ask the audience a question to which you do not already know the answer.” Well, clearly there was something I didn’t know. It was left up to me to interpret my audience’s answer. What did it mean? Read more »

Cinema

Movie, Motion Picture, Flickers…which is it?

Coming-SoonI really have a problem with the word MOVIE. It sounds so juvenile. Pictures that move! Sounds like something from 1900s, back when the frame rate was really low, like 16 frames a second. No wonder they called them “flickers”.

I still occasionally hear someone say, “I’m going to the flicks.” Don’t you? I guess some things just stay with us. So, instead, we call it “motion pictures” which doesn’t sound a whole lot better. Last February at the HPA (Hollywood Post Alliance) the final speaker was an industry guru, John Watkinson (with his long hair and long beard, he LOOKS like a guru.) He got up and the first thing he said was a real epiphany. “I have never seen a movie or a motion picture.” The audience couldn’t figure out just what he was saying. “All I’ve ever seen is a series of still images, run rapidly in front of my eyes.” And because of ‘persistence of vision’ which we humans share with only a few other creatures on earth, it looks like a moving picture.

So where is the REAL moving picture? Read more »

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